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General Dentistry

What Saliva Does and How Dry Mouth Can Affect Your Health

Dry mouth happens when your mouth produces little to no saliva. What little saliva you have might be thick and stringy. But dry mouth is more than just feeling thirsty. Saliva helps you taste what you eat and drink, and it helps you digest your food. It flushes food particles away from your teeth and neutralizes acids to help prevent tooth decay. Dry mouth is also called xerostomia.
 

Dry mouth happens when your mouth produces little to no saliva. What little saliva you have might be thick and stringy. But dry mouth is more than just feeling thirsty. Saliva helps you taste what you eat and drink, and it helps you digest your food. It flushes food particles away from your teeth and neutralizes acids to help prevent tooth decay. Dry mouth is also called xerostomia.
 

Dry Mouth Includes Dry Skin

Lack of saliva causes the skin in and around the mouth to become dry and tight. Your lips may become cracked, and sores might form at the corners of your mouth. Your tongue can feel rough and dry as well. And you might have trouble swallowing or difficulty speaking without the lubrication that saliva provides.

General Dentistry

Periodontal Maintenance

Periodontal diseases are infections of the gums, which gradually destroy the support of your natural teeth. There are numerous disease entities requiring different treatment approaches. Dental plaque is the primary cause of gum disease in genetically susceptible individuals. Daily brushing and flossing will prevent most periodontal conditions.

 

Why Is Oral Hygiene So Important?

Adults over 35 lose more teeth to gum diseases, (periodontal disease) than from cavities. Three out of four adults are affected by periodontal disease at some time in their life. The best way to prevent cavities and periodontal disease is through good tooth brushing and flossing techniques, performed daily.
 

Periodontal disease and decay are both caused by bacterial plaque and can be accelerated by a number of different factors. Plaque is a colorless film that sticks to your teeth at the gum line. Plaque constantly forms on your teeth. By thorough daily brushing and flossing, you can remove these germs and help prevent periodontal disease.

If not carefully removed by daily brushing and flossing, plaque hardens into a rough, porous substance known as calculus (or tartar)

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